Take a gap year, do voluntary work and visit Mole National Park!

Watching bathing elephants from the viewpoint veranda.

Watching bathing elephants from the viewpoint veranda.

On the look out for elephant trails in the bush.

On the look out for elephant trails in the bush.

If you have a gap year, take the opportunity to contribute and get some experience by doing voluntary work in your field of study/or expertise.

Then as a break from your volunteer work, why don’t visit Ghana’s largest national park Mole. Just a day trip away from Tamale, this amazing and beautifully lushy place awaits you full of adventure. Enjoy the peace at the motel’s viewpoint veranda while scouting for bathing elefants below, or climb the roof of a jeep to go antelope spotting down in the bush?

What ever your mind of a great experience is – Mole has much to offer. During the dry season the park is especially well visited by a multitude of animals coming to drink in the local water ponds.

 More pictures at the site of Mole Motel >>

Read more about Mole at GhanaWeb >>

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Staff presentations. PART 2: Ben Iddrisu Nindow

Mr Ben on motorbike. Ben Iddrisu Nindow is the last of eight children, born to the kombon-naa family in Bilpela-Tamale in 1959. He started his primary education in Kakpagyili catholic primary school, spending the frist two years studying under a Dawadawa tree before transferring to Bamvim presby primary, and than to Bamvim middy school. In 1973 Ben entered Ghana secondary school and proceeded to the Nyarkpala Agricultural College to train as an agricultural extension officer.

The working life started in 1981 when Ben was posted to the Gambaga district with MOFA. One year later he joined the Tamale Baptist agric project as a project manager for 5 years. He served as correspondence assistant for sponsored children in Bilpela under a world vision project between 1988 and 1996 before taking up an appointment with the then western Dagomba district council as farm manager. Another three year service as extension officer with the presby farmers training program ended with admission to the Tamale Polytechnic in 1991. On completion of his first duty post was as cross room teacher in Bimbila senior high school, and later as field officer with CAPSARD under a MOFA/ French embassy rice project. Ben is a good listener, talks little and is easy to related too. He loves reading and listening to music!

Internship and volunteer work in Ghana: EDUCATION

According to UNESCO, 58 million children in the world are out of school, and 43% of them will probably never enter a classroom. The goal is to have all children in school by 2015, but the challenges are many. The situation is especially challenging in Sub-Saharan Africa. Going to school can be expensive, classrooms are generally overcrowded, there are not enough qualified teachers, and many schools lack access to electricity as well as adequate teaching materials.

This means the situation is tuff, but it also means that there are a lot of things we can do to make the situation better! For example UNESCO estimates that in the coming decades, 27 million teachers will be needed to meet the growing demand for education world wide.

Would you like to volunteer as a teacher, or support a Ghanian student?

Read more about our internship/volunteer programme >>

Check out our student sponsorship project >>

 

Volunteer work and internship opportunities in Northern Ghana!

Voluntary Aid Africa W

Check out the programme overview at our webpage for more information about volunteer work and internship opportunities in Northern Ghana!

HOPE TO SEE YOU SOON!

Read up on Ghana before your volunteer work!

To get the full potential out of your internship or volunteer work in Ghana it’s helpful to read up on some history and general knowledge regarding the local culture and traditions.

As far as general travel and country information goes, there are several publications in English that offers insightful tips about where to go, what to see, when and how. The Bradt Travel Guide by Philip Briggs is one example that we can recommend.

Dagombas are the largest “tribal group” in the Northern region, and when it comes to local culture and traditions several books have been written on the theme. One of the more sited works is The Lions of Dagbon: Political Change in Northern Ghana, which was written by Martin Staniland as early as 1975. Also Christine Oppong’s pice Growing up in Dagbon is a well renowned publication about Dagomba cultural and traditions.

Volunteer work in Ghana

The Bradt Travel Guide

Volunteer work in Ghana

Growing up in Dagbon

Volunteer work in Ghana

The Lions of Dagbon

For more information and suggestions about Ghana literature, see the Goodreads section on the right, or visit our Goodreads profile online >>

Dagomba dancing and drumming

Dagomba Dancing Drumming

Dagomba Drumming and Dancing

The history of Dagomba’s are to a large part narrated through the practice of drumming and dancing. Apart from that – taking part in or witnessing a Dagbamba dancing and drumming performance  is really an entraining and uplifting experience. At Voluntary Aid Africa we have good established contacts with professional Drummers, and can offer good opportunities for anyone interested to learn and participate in this cultural practice. There are also several online resources to learn more about the tradition. For example:

N’Banga Cultural Group >>

Dagomba Dance and Drumming >>

Drums of the Dagbon >>

 

Shea – A Ghana industry

Shea Nuts is an industry in Ghana.

Shea Nuts is an industry in Ghana.

Shea nut processing is an important and relatively large sector within the northern regions of Ghana. Last week the minister of Trade an Industry announced that the Government is to spend about 5 million Ghana Cedis to boost the industry further. An initiative that is expected to support and develop the industry by constructing new processing plants and train more women.

Read more at Modern Ghana >>

On the theme of Happiness :)

The UNDP (United Nations Development Program) has published a report about the happiest countries in the world (World Happiness Report, 2013). Ghana ranked number 86 out of 156. If the evaluation would have been in terms of smiles – Ghana probably would have made number one, but parameters such as healthy life expectancy and perception of corruption were also taken into account.

Read the full article on The Huffington Post >>

African (Ghanian) architecture

Traditional Dagomba house.

Traditional Dagomba house.

African adobe architecture, and especially in the area around northern Ghana, Burkina Faso and Mali, is well known for its remarkable shapes, forms and ornaments. There are all kinds, ranging from The Great Mud Mosque in Djenné, to the stunning paintwork aplied on family-houses in Sirigu. Every tribal group have their own particular way of constructing houses, and in Tamale you will find the typical Dagomba houses both in the central parts of town as well as outside in the local communites. The houses are traditionally build in mud, with a rounded grass roof, and detailed decorations around the entrance.

Check out these other beauties at Pinterest >>

Ghana textiles – a winning concept!

Colourful Ghana textiles.

Colourful Ghana textiles.

Dresses by Ghanian fashion designer Kofi Ansah.

Dresses by Ghanian fashion designer Kofi Ansah.

The winner of episode 4 in the BBS interior-design show The Great Interior Design Challenge used colourful textiles from Ghana in his decor. The Ghanian textile industry is well know all over the world for its remarkable patterns and color compositions.

One of the formost representatives and ambassadors for Ghanian textiles, the renowned designer Kofi Ansah, has created multiple pieces using local fabrics. His work has amazed thousands and some of his lines have been showed at Tigo Glitz African Fashion Week, and sold abroad in London and the US. Today the sad news was released that Mr Kofi Ansah has passed away at the age of 62. 

The reputation and interest for Ghana textiles will most likely continue to blossom world wide, but the local industry is meeting tuff competition from cheap imports, and is currently employing fewer workers than before.

Read more about these challenges >>

Or check out these gorgeous Woodin prints at Pinterest >>